Comprehensive Planning Underway Driven by Met Council

By 2018, each city in the 7-county Metro area is expected to complete what’s called a “Comprehensive Plan”, required by state law.  These plans are fully revisited / revised every 10 years and the last round was completed in 2008. The unelected Met Council sets the framework and assumptions for these plans and specifies what categories of content and level of detail makes a plan “acceptable”. This time, the assignment is to look at the metro area needs across the next 20 – 25 years, out to 2040.  Work has begun on the plans in 3 of the 4 cities in SD49 and citizen involvement will be needed this summer.

Estimated population and housing needs drive much of the planning.  The Met Council has established specific city-by-city targets for growth, particularly in the areas of low-to-moderate-income housing growth by 2030. 

Continue on to read about SD49 city planning assumptions and how you can get involved.

In the metro area, median income is defined as $85,800 for a family of four, so low income is $25,740 for a family of four and moderate income is defined as $65,700.

Low-income apartment monthly rentals, including utilities, would range from $450 (efficiency) to $750 (4-bedroom). For purchases, the Met Council assumes buyers make a down-payment of less than 4%,  and qualify for a 4% 30-year-fixed mortgage. Then a home purchase price of $82,500 would meet low-income guidelines.

Click HERE to read the Met Council Low-Income Housing Guidelines 

To put the Housing planning figures in perspective, Minneapolis (population 400,370) is classified as an Urban Center, and is expected to add about 3,500 total low-to-moderate-income housing units, of which about 1550 are low-income.

Across the 4 cities in SD49 two are “urban”, two are “suburban”.  The combined population is around 244,700, i.e., a bit more than half that of Minneapolis. Together we’re expected (per the Met Council Housing Policy) to add far more low-cost housing than Minneapolis:  more than 3,900 units for low-to-moderate-income housing, of which 1,985 are low-income.

For SD49, here’s a city-by-city quick summary with links for more information.

Edina (pop. 47,900)

Edina’s website indicates the full Comprehensive Plan update work will start in 2016.  In 2015 they hired a consultant (Future IQ) and involved fewer than 600 of Edina’s 47,900 citizens in “Vision Edina”, preparing a Strategic Vision and Framework that will serve as a foundation for planning. That report is available on the city website. Click HERE 

The Met Council has designated Edina as “Urban” and the Met Council Housing Policy states that by 2030 Edina must develop 878 new low-to-moderate-income housing units as their “share” of the region’s needs, of which 365 are low-income.

Click HERE for the Met Council’s Edina Statement

Minnetonka (pop. 49,700)

 Minnetonka is starting their vision-development process this summer, called “Imagine Minnetonka”.  They’ve hired consultant Rebecca Ryan from Next Generation Consulting.  Town Hall meetings are set for August 24 and October 12, with a virtual Town Hall on September 21.  Key dates for more meetings and other ways to participate are at the city website. Click HERE

The Met Council has designated Minnetonka as “Suburban” and the Met Council Housing Policy states that by 2030 Minnetonka must develop 1064 new low-to-moderate income housing units as their “share” of the region’s needs, of which 508 are low-income.

Click HERE for the Met Council’s Minnetonka Statement

Eden Prairie (pop. 60,800)

Eden Prairie’s website does not mention a full Comprehensive Plan 2040 update.  The Comprehensive plan approved in 2008 is viewable online. The Met Council has designated Eden Prairie as “Suburban” and the Met Council Housing Policy states that by 2030 Eden Prairie must develop 1408 new low-to-moderate income housing units as their “share” of the region’s needs, of which 802 are low-income.

Click HERE for the Met Council’s Eden Prairie Statement

Bloomington (pop. 86,300)

Bloomington has started its planning, called “Forward 2040”.   The first of a series of single-topic community meetings was on June 23, attended by about 60 people. The topic was “Sustainability” (see our separate article in July for attendee impressions).   The next town hall on July 13 will focus on “Community Diversity and Engagement” and the final one a week later on July 20 will discuss “Community Amenities”.  Bloomington is also seeking 7 volunteers for a year-long citizen advisory committee, and applications are due by August.

More information is on the city website. Click HERE  

The Met Council has designated Bloomington as “Urban” and the Met Council Housing Policy states that by 2030 Bloomington must develop 586 new low-to-moderate income housing units as their “share” of the region’s needs, of which 310 are low-income.

Click HERE for the Met Council’s Bloomington Statement. 

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