Preparing for MN 2020 Primary: How Voter Registration Works in Florida

With Minnesota moving to a presidential primary in 2020, voters in that primary will likely have to identify their party affiliation to vote for their party’s candidates. How do other states with a presidential primary work it? We asked Max Robinson, a former resident of Senate District 49, how it works in his new state. And along the way learned that MN is one of only 3 states which does not have provisional ballots.

FL_Registration_Card.jpgIn Florida, you must be registered under your party to vote in that party's primary and the party affiliations of voters is public. You don't have to register under a party but then you can't vote in the primaries. I think that's a good way to do it and it stops some primary skullduggery.

We have "Ballot on Demand" here where they print a ballot showing only the offices you are eligible to vote for. They print your ballot on the spot when you enter the polling place or you can order an absentee ballot. Only Republicans are listed on my ballot in primary elections. Then, in the general election, candidates from all the parties are shown. You cannot vote across party lines in primaries but you can in general elections.

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Conference Committee to Consider Controversial Measure in Omnibus Education Bill

Chalk_Board_Sex_Education.jpgThe Ominbus Education Bill (House bill HF2400) passed on to the MN Senate mandates a model of sexual education for use in Minnesota schools. Opportunities for parental advice and consent is minimized short of removing a child from the class. The Senate’s companion bill (SF0007) does not contain the language for Comprehensive Sex Education, and the differences will be resolved in a Conference Committee.

In the House bill:
• The MN Commissioner of Education must identify a model comprehensive sexual health education program for K through 12 and provide it to all schools, including written materials, curriculum resources, and training for instructors.
• It must teach "consent," which the legislation describes as "affirmative, conscious, and voluntary agreement to engage in interpersonal, physical, or sexual activity." This assumes and normalizes value-free sexual activity among children.
• It must teach "bodily autonomy." Bodily autonomy teaches that one has the right to kill a preborn child in one's body, and therefore abortion is moral.
• It must teach "diverse sexual orientations and gender identities." The legislation allows instruction by "community organizations." Schools could select Planned Parenthood and/or gender activist groups to teach, regardless of their qualifications or real agenda.
• A school district that does not adopt the state model program must include all of the items listed and then submit its sexual health education program to the MN Department of Education for approval. This kills any semblance of local control. Parents cannot appeal to their local school board to challenge what is deeply offensive to them.
• It must teach "abstinence and other methods for preventing unintended pregnancy." What is uncertain is how much emphasis abstinence will get, given the other mandated subjects.
• It must refer students to "local resources for services related to sexual and reproductive health." That could open the door to the referral of children to Planned Parenthood for abortion and birth control without parental knowledge or consent.

The Senate’s companion bill (SF0007) does not contain the language for Comprehensive Sex Education.

The Conference Committee members from the House are James T. Davnie (DFL, SE Minneapolis), Cheryl Youakim (DFL, Hopkins & St. Louis Park), Dave Pinto (DFL, Highland Park), Julie Sandstede,(DFL, Hibbing) and Dean Urdahl (R, Grove City). The Senate members are Carla Nelson (R, Rochester/SD26) John Jasinski (R,Faribault/SD24), Bill Weber (R, Luverne/SD22), Justin Eichorn (R, Grand Rapids/SD05), and Charles Wiger (DFL, Maplewood/SD43).

In expressing your opinion to these legislators, you don’t need to compose a different email for each one. Sending out an email to all of the members as a kind of email blitz works just as well. However, each member of the committee should receive a copy of the email; don’t just send an email to the Committee Chair or Republican Lead. We will update THIS LINK with the list of legislators to contact to urge the removal of this language from the final bill.


Flohrs Predicts Deadlock as 2019 Legislative Session Wraps Up

Jason_Flohrs_AFP_thumbnail.jpgJason Flohrs, State Director for the Minnesota Chapter of Americans for Prosperity, was the featured speaker at Senate District 49 Republicans’ April dinner program. He painted a sobering picture of the obstacles that Gov. Walz and the Minnesota legislature must overcome to reach a budget agreement before the start of the state’s next fiscal year in July. The differences between the DFL-controlled House and the Senate Republican majority will require significant compromises if a state government shutdown is to be avoided.

Flohrs stated that it is the role of the Minnesota legislature to prioritize the needs of Minnesotans within a reasonable budget. This task has been complicated by the view of the DFL governor and DFL House of what constitutes a reasonable budget.

In February, one month into the 2019 legislative session, the Minnesota Office of Management and Budget forecast a $1B surplus for FY 20-21. Gov. Walz’ proposed budget consumed that surplus and demanded more. At $49.5B, it represents a 10% increase over the FY 18-19 budget. The built-in growth in planned spending goes well beyond FY 20-21. Much of the increased spending is not mentioned because it will occur beyond the planning window.

When your appetite for spending exceeds the $1B surplus, what do you do? You simply push for tax increases, without regard to their impacts. A 70% increase in the gas tax, for example. Flohrs pointed out that Walz never campaigned full-out for a 20-cent-a-gallon gas tax increase. He mentioned it, backed off, argued that it should be looked at, but never made it a key point of his candidacy. Now, Walz claims he has a mandate to raise the gas tax, to the point that Minnesotans will be paying the fourth highest gas tax in the nation.

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The Last Election?

Election_Integrity.jpgLast Monday, while many of us technological Neanderthals who still can’t bring ourselves to E-File were standing in line at the Post Office, the Minnesota Court of Appeals in Saint Paul handed down the latest decision in the seemingly endless saga of Cilek v. Office of Minnesota Secretary of State. To the amazement of just about nobody, the three judge panel unanimously “Affirmed” the decision of the Ramsey County District Court in July 2018, ordering the Secretary of State to comply with the request from the Minnesota Voters Alliance, for the public records from the election of 2016.

In a sharp rebuke to the Secretary of State, the Court said that the law he was citing to refuse the request, didn’t classify the information as non-public and didn’t allow him the discretion to keep it from the public!

Immediately, the Secretary of State’s office blurted out a press release full of vacuous and sanctimonious rationalizations about “protecting the privacy rights of voters” and opposing those who “seek to suppress the votes of thousands of eligible voters”, although no one has ever bothered to explain just exactly how anyone might be “suppressed” by the Secretary of State’s office being compelled to obey the law.

Ok, so let’s get this straight. Secretary of State Steve Simon isn’t ignorant about the law, and he most certainly isn’t without competent legal advice. And yet he insists on pushing this totally groundless effort, to deny the MVA the data that everybody knows is public, all the way to the Minnesota Supreme Court….Really????

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Bloomington Community Center: What Are the REAL Needs?

The Bloomington City Council has a number of significant decisions coming in the near future that will involve substantial cash expenditures.  Last October, the city identified eleven properties that are in “unsatisfactory” condition.  These include Creekside Community Center and five of Bloomington’s six fire stations.

Community_Center.JPGWhile we are certainly dismayed that the city has let critical infrastructure like fire stations deteriorate to such an extent, we certainly support the repair or replacement of any fire station that is in unsatisfactory condition. The Creekside Community Center occupies a sixty-year-old elementary school building that appears to no longer be suitable as a recreational and social facility for seniors. The city claims that upgrades would cost far more than the building is worth. We are willing to concede this point as well.

We are skeptical, however, about the recent decisions that the Bloomington City Council has taken. Faced with eleven properties that are in need of repair or replacement, half of which are clearly high priority, the city leaders appear ready to embark on two major capital projects.

The first is the building of an expensive community center for people of all ages. Earlier this month the Council directed city staff to develop plans for a new community center at the Valley View complex on 90th Street between Nicollet and Portland Avenues, destroying the recently (2012) renovated and highly popular outdoor Family Aquatic Center at the Valley View complex.

Bloomington’s community center has been under study since 2015. It quickly became more than a replacement for the aging center for seniors. Bloomington needed its own community center to rival ones in Eden Prairie and Minnetonka. Existing recreational facilities and meeting rooms in Bloomington schools; the YMCA in Edina; and commercial exercise and training facilities in Bloomington were not fit for the vision.

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Edelson’s Priority? Candidate Tax Returns, Not Program Fraud

Edelson_priorities.JPGMinnesota House Rep. Heather Edelson (DFL, Edina) has had the chance to weigh in on critical issues facing our state in her first term in office. As a member of the Health and Human Services Policy committee, one would think that Edelson would be in the forefront of addressing child care fraud and the effort to grant more independence to the Inspector General from the House and Human Services Department. Sadly, this has not been true.

Instead, we are disappointed to learn that Edelson is co-sponsoring House File 2752, which would require U.S. Presidential Candidates to publicly release their federal tax returns for the last 5 years. Should any Presidential Candidate choose not to publicly release their federal tax returns, the proposed legislation would ban placing the name of that candidate on primary ballots and general election ballots.

So, rather than working hard to stop the illegal use of taxpayer dollars, Rep. Edelson appears focused on national politics. She wants to make public how Presidential candidates, who legally pay their taxes, earn and spend their dollars. And she would ban from the ballot anyone who considers this a blatant invasion of privacy. Guess who she is really targeting!

Yes, elections have consequences. Tell Rep. Heather Edelson where you stand on this issue.


Rep. Elkins Wants More Trains in Your Backyard

As the Legislature took a break, one of our readers asked Rep. Steve Elkins (DFL, Bloomington) about the bill (HF1783) he co-sponsored enabling yet again another study of the Dan Patch freight rail line for mass transit.

As pointed out by Russ Burnison, co-chair of Senate District 49 Republicans, “We have had 2 studies already about putting commuter rail on the freight line from Savage [through Bloomington and Edina] to St Louis Park. Both times it did not go over, so why spend more tax dollars to do it again?”

Dan_Patch_Commuter_Rail.jpgElkins’ response? “We are not talking about commuter rail, we are talking about something like this [picture at right], which is far less expensive and intrusive than commuter rail”.

If it walks like a duck, and talks like a duck, and quacks like a duck… It sure looks like commuter rail to us!

If it is far less expensive than commuter rail, then why didn’t Elkins, when he was on the Metropolitan Council, push for “something like this” instead of the Southwest Light Rail line?

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Legislative Action Alert - April 9 - Education Omnibus Bill

As you may know Representative Sondra Erickson is the Republican Lead of the House Education Policy Committee. According to Representative Erickson’s legislative aide, the status of HF 1414-“Comprehensive Sex Education.” is that the bill has been rolled into HF 2400-Education Finance Omnibus Bill, to be voted on and sent on to the Senate. The legislative aide said that no further action is planned for the Omnibus Bill, but she also added that the House could bring it up for a vote at any time after April 9.

The problem that each of us needs to address as soon as possible is twofold:

First, the bill advances the DFL’s campaign to completely strip away the right of local communities to control their own Public Schools, by centralizing both funding and curriculum in the hands of the State of Minnesota Department of Education.

And secondly, the bill redefines “Sex Education” to include not just how the human body works to reproduce itself, but a comprehensive and Progressive code of conduct and behavior, almost entirely written by Planned Parenthood and radical LBGTQ groups.

Please look at these links and respond as you think proper:

CLICK HERE to read the text of the bill, HF1414 

CLICK HERE to read and view more from the Child Protection League regarding the bill’s origination, authors and content

CLICK HERE to review additional information on the Child Protection League’s website

We’ve included a list of relevant State Legislators below (Updated May 7 with Conference Committee) should you wish to write or call one or more legislators to voice your opposition to HF 1414 and HF 2400.

In closing, if you decide to express your opinion to these legislators, you don’t need to compose a different email for each representative or senator. We’ve found that sending out an email to all of the members of one committee as a kind of email blitz works just as well. However, each member of the committee should receive a copy of the email; don’t just send an email to the Committee Chair or Republican Lead.

Thank you very much.

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Rep. Carlson Acting Against Civil Forfeiture Reform

By Zavier Bicott, Chair, MN Republican Liberty Caucus

Andrew_Carlson50B.jpgState Representative Andrew Carlson (DFL, Bloomington) does not seem to get that his first responsibility is to defend his constituents' constitutional rights including due process and property rights.

A Minnesotan who has not been convicted or even been charged with a crime should not lose his property through civil asset forfeiture.

But more than 7,000 times a year, Minnesotans are forfeiting property in civil court regardless of whether any criminal prosecution takes place in criminal court.

Sadly, Rep. Carlson supports the continued use of civil forfeiture.

He voted against the forfeiture reform bill, HF 1971, on March 11 in the House Judiciary Finance and Civil Law Committee.

 

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Rep. Elkins Promises Public Health Care On the Way

Why would the DFL Governor push a more expensive insurance subsidy plan that supports fewer people?

Elkins.jpgRep Steve Elkins (DFL, Bloomington) recently gave a hint in his newsletter to constituents. He claimed that Walz’s plan “includes a temporary funding extension to ensure low-cost coverage to those effected.” (sic)

Elkins was alluding to the DFL plan to extend the provider tax. This tax would be passed on to every patient, adding $1 billion to the cost of health care over the next two years.

Again, why would the DFL want to make private health care even more expensive? Rep Elkins claims that “the Governor is also working on a long-term solution that would deliver an additional, affordable and sustainable public health care option.”

Republicans do not believe that the only option for affordable health care is state-run health care. House Minority Leader Kurt Daudt told The Associated Press that the state can squeeze enough money out of other sources to fund health care programs for people who really need help paying their medical bills. "Everybody in the state campaigned on lowering health care costs, and you can't lower health care costs by raising health care costs." Rep Daudt (R, Crown) said. He went on to say that the state could free up money by making public programs more efficient, eliminating fraud in the state's troubled Child Care Assistance Program and kicking people off public programs who don't qualify.



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